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Ethical Decision Making - The Wicked Dimensions

Charging dead people banks fees, ball tampering in cricket, excessively sedating people in aged care homes – viewed in isolation these things are confronting and cause us to immediately look for the bad person to blame. But is this true? Are all bad things done by bad people?

Social psychology research (Stout, 2005) shows only about 4% of the population could be considered bad – habitually acting in an amoral and antisocial way. Although other research indicates the corporate world may in fact attract those with sociopathic tendencies, it’s a stretch to blame all bad things on bad people. So what’s going on? How do good people end up unintentionally creating bad outcomes?

QUT’s Ethical Decision Making – The Wicked Dimensions looks to understand and address situations where unethical decisions can be and often are made, and how you can address those situations when they arise in your organisation.

During this course, you will learn the wicked dimensions of ethical decision making. This includes how contact, personal factors and history influence and distort ethical decision making; how cognitive bias and perceptual blindness may cause you to miss the ethical dilemma completely; why perceptions of unfairness in organisations can trigger unethical actions; and the flawed justifications for ‘bad’ behaviour and the antidotes.

You and your fellow participants will leave the course with a better understanding of how unethical situations unravel within organisations, and the skills and knowledge to address and stop these situations in their tracks before they escalate, affect the organisation and its stakeholders, and become public knowledge.

Whether you’re an established or aspiring leader, our range of learning experiences will provide you with the frameworks and skills to navigate a wide range of complex situations from managing conflicts of interest to addressing poor behaviour.
Designed for both corporate and public sector employees across all role levels, QUT’s ethics training will teach participants how to:

  • Recognise an ethical issue
  • Collect relevant information and examine the facts
  • Evaluate the options according to ethical standards
  • Make an informed decision
  • Take action and reflect on the outcome

In this workshop we will explore the wicked dimensions of ethical decision making including:

  • how contact, personal factors and history influence and distort ethical decision making
  • how cognitive bias and perceptual blindness may cause you to miss the ethical dilemma completely
  • why perceptions of unfairness in organisations can trigger unethical actions
  • the flawed justifications for ‘bad’ behaviour and the antidotes.
Date:
Wednesday, September 11, 2019
Time:
9am - 4:30pm (registrations from 8:45am)
Cost:
See website
Venue/Address:
QUT Executive Education Centre, B Block, QUT Gardens Point, 2 George St, Brisbane QLD 4001
City/Town:
Brisbane
Host:
Queensland University of Technology
Type:
Continuing Professional Development
Guest speakers:

Dr Alistair Ping is an Adjunct Professor at QUT Graduate School of Business where he teaches leadership and ethics. He was the recipient of 2017-18 Colin Brain Governance Fellowship at QUT and was also awarded the 2002 Coral Sea Scholarship from the Australian-American Fulbright Foundation to study corporate social responsibility trends in the USA. He has worked as a corporate consultant, trainer and executive coach in Australia, the UK, USA and Africa.

Dr Mark Harvey has internationally recognised capabilities and experience in the creation and review of misconduct and corruption prevention and investigation programs for organisations. Mark has a combination of over twenty-five year’s law enforcement, criminal and misconduct investigations and integrity program design and implementation experience. He is a renowned facilitator, known for skilling leaders from a wide range of industries to encourage professional conduct, promote brand and industry stakeholder confidence, and develop robust misconduct and corruption investigation and prevention programs for their business and sector.

Professor Melinda Edwards has been nationally recognised for her teaching excellence and has conducted commercial research and capacity building courses in mediation, negotiation, access to justice, human rights and anti-corruption both domestically and internationally. Melinda has worked for both government and corporate sectors in Malaysia, Thailand, Myanmar and Bhutan, most recently creating and delivering a bespoke program for a gold mining operation in Papua New Guinea.